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Archive for the ‘quotes’ Category

Travel photo Monday: postcards of my summer travels

So where I have been the last couple of months, you might ask. Well, I was, of course, travelling; a few days, a few days there as you will see: France, UK, Luxembourg and Austria.

H and C exhibition
A friend of mine, Heather Carroll, and I had a joint art exhibition, held in wine cellars in Ahn on the Moselle. I exhibited some of my textured photos and she exhibited some of her woven wall hangings inspired by the spirit of the sea

Photos from 20140807-Marie-Noelle Fontan exhibition
We visited an exhibition by Marie-Noelle Fontan who incorporates leaves, seeds, seed heads and twigs into her woven wall hangings

Photos from 20140724-France
In France nuits romanes were being celebrated in the Poitou Charente and the sunflowers were at their best

Photos from 2014_08_16-Milton Abbas-Okeford  Fitzpaine-2BA
Dorset is home to the beautiful Milton Abbey with its fabulous stained glass window, featuring a tree of Jesse, by Pugin

Photos from 2014_08_17-Clifton walk-2BA
Walking with my sister and her husband, over from the US, around Clifton Wood, Bristol, brought back memories of our childhood spent there

Photos from 2014_08_19-Salisbury-Mompesson
We drove down to Salisbury to visit Mompesson House where the Victorian artist Barbara Thompson lived and painted. There was an exhibition of contemporary works there which included a dress covered in leaves and butterflies exquisitely executed by Jane Hall.

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Salisbury cathedral rises above the beautiful cathedral close. The ‘walking Madonna’ is by Elizabeth Frink

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a few glimpses of Bath and its abbey

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Luxembourg held its annual street art/animation festival where street performers from far afield come for a weekend to entertain thousands of visitors

Photos from 20140828-Wachau
Last, but not least, we visited friends in Austria, starting in the wine lands of Wachau

Photos from 20140829-Schafberg
followed by a train ride up to the Schafberspitze, from where you can see 7 lakes

Photos from 20140830-Hangar-7-Salzburg
Hangar 7, Salzburg, is home to the private collection of aeroplanes and racing cars belonging to the man who invented the Red Bull drink

Photos from 20140830-Salzburg
Salzburg in the rain – what better argument did we need to seek cover in the Stiegl brewery after looking round the castle and then demolishing a huge slice of Sachertorte in the famous Cafe Sacher. The fence on both sides of the bridge across the river had been adorned with thousands of padlocks, like votive offerings they are signs of love in modern times.

Photos from 20140901-03-Vienna-Schonbrunn-Belvedere
Vienna’s Schonbrunn Palace was still beautiful in the rain. Hungry sparrows, starved for food because of the previous 2 days non-stop rain, hardly gave us a chance to eat our apple strudel in the cafe. The Upper Belvedere gave me the chance to see Klimt’s masterpiece “the kiss” in the flesh as it were. Unfortunately it was too wet to enjoy the gardens to the full although we did walk the length of them

Photos from 20140901-03-Vienna-city-visit
Inner Vienna – the only dry day we had – and a chance to see the inner city from the comfort of a horse-drawn carriage. The architect Loos, whose building the “Loos Haus” (now the Raiffeisen Bank) caused scandal in its time because of its simple lines, described the Viennese as being “pathologically addicted to ornament”. This was evident everywhere. Every facade had faces peeping from them and doors with colonnades on either side sported mythological creatures supporting them. Vienna was indeed a feast for the eyes for those with an interest in architecture.

As I write this the space available to me in my office diminishes daily as we pack up boxes and store them there in preparation for moving house. Breathing space is needed and a new adventure calls…..

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The rocks remain in Cappadocia

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The finest workers in stone are not copper or steel tools, but the gentle touches of air and water working at their leisure with a liberal allowance of time. – Henry David Thoreau

DP Photo Challenge

Ese’s shoot and quote challenge: awakening

Life is perhaps most wisely regarded as a bad dream between two awakenings, and every day is a life in miniature – Eugene O’Neil, Marco Millions (1928) act 2, sc. 2

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the moment in time when the old and the new are together

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winter sunrise in Luxembourg

Sharing with Ese’s Voice

travel theme: gardens

This week Ailsa led us up the garden path.

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the gazebo (*) at Sissinghurst, Kent

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Montacute

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gazebo in the grounds of Holcombe House near Lynton, Devon

The Parc de Wesserling in Alsace, France, holds a garden festival each year. It’s situated in an old industrial complex that used to be a fabric mill. Its displays therefore are linked to fabric in some way. There are always a couple of “follies” (**) hidden away:

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fabric hut based on a dream catcher

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inside the garden shed of my dreams …

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entrance to the grass house

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The whole complex of La Scarzuola could be described as one large folly. See more of my pictures of this extraordinary place here.

Inspired by the idea of having a retreat of my own, In a corner of our garden I maintained an area that I called the wild patch and in it I constructed my ‘folly’, complete with an old iron grate in which I planted geraniums. Unfortunately our next door neighbours cut down some of the trees forming the boundary between our two properties thereby removing much of my privacy.

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the basic construction

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inside looking out

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I added a candelabra

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and decided to create a little magic….

(*) A gazebo is a pavilion structure, sometimes octagonal or turret-shaped, often built in a park, garden or spacious public area.
Gazebos are freestanding or attached to a garden wall, roofed, and open on all sides; they provide shade, shelter, ornamental features in a landscape, and a place to rest. Some gazebos in public parks are large enough to serve as bandstands or rain shelters.
Gazebos include pavilions, kiosks, alhambras, belvederes, follies, pergolas, and rotundas. Such structures are popular in warm and sunny climates. They are in the literature of China, Persia, and many other classical civilizations, going back to several millennia. Examples of such structures are the garden houses at Montacute House in Somerset, England.

(**) In architecture, a folly is a building constructed primarily for decoration, but either suggesting by its appearance some other purpose, or merely so extravagant that it transcends the normal range of garden ornaments or other class of building to which it belongs. In the original use of the word, these buildings had no other use, but from the 19th to 20th centuries the term was also applied to highly decorative buildings which had secondary practical functions such as housing, sheltering or business use.

18th century English gardens and French landscape gardening often featured Roman temples, which symbolized classical virtues or ideals. Other 18th-century garden follies represented Chinese temples, Egyptian pyramids, ruined abbeys, or Tatar tents, to represent different continents or historical eras. Sometimes they represented rustic villages, mills and cottages, to symbolize rural virtues. Many follies, particularly during famine, such as the Irish potato famine, were built as a form of poor relief, to provide employment for peasants and unemployed artisans. (Wikipedia).

I make no apologies for borrowing Ailsa’s wonderful garden quotes:

Won’t you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you. – Richard Brinsley Sheridan

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. – Marcus Tullius Cicero