Art, Creativity, Photography, Travel, Writing

Posts tagged ‘Friday Finds’

Friday Finds: pagoda crowns

In Myanmar (Burma) many of the stupas or pyramids have crowns perched on top of them. These crowns are hung with bells which tinkle delightfully in the slightest breeze. The crowns are made in specialist metal workshops in Mandalay.

20150209_3339-pagoda-crown_resize

20150209_3342-drawing-a-crown_resize

20150209_3356-metalwork-workshop_resize
Notice how the guys use their feet to hold things in place

20150209_3355-metalwork-workshop_resize

20150209_3343-pagoda-crown_resize

20150209_3344-pagoda-crowns_resize

20150131_2002-Sule-paya_resize
crowns at the Sule Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: antique stencilled door

P2270377-stencilled-pattern
detail from an antique stencilled door in Thailand

200903050121_master-bedroom-entrance_resize

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: silk weaving in Myanmar

Nothing automated about these old wooden looms, apparently still in good working order

20150211_4043-Inle-silk-weaving_resize

20150211_4047-Inle-silk-weaving_resize

20150211_4046-Inle-silk-weaving-bobbins_resize

20150211_4053-Inle-silk-weaving_resize
and the colours of the silk were so vivid.

The fabric being woven will eventually be made into a woman’s longyi, a tube of fabric that acts like a skirt worn by men and women. Men in Sri Lanka also wear them. A woman is supposed to step into hers and a man should put his on over his head. Weaving a length of fabric for a longyi – usually 2 metres long and about 80cm wide – can take a month or longer, especially if the design is particularly complicated. This explains why the silk ones are so expensive.

“Men who cannot read are like the blind; women who cannot weave are like the cripple”
—an old Burmese saying at a time when every household had a handloom and the women wove all the longyis for the family

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: teapots in Myanmar

The approach to the Shwe Inn Thein pagoda at In Dein, Lake Inle, Myanmar, is up a long slope of very many steps. Fortunately it’s covered, for in the heat of the day, it would be impossible to climb. It’s lined with stalls selling all sorts of handicrafts but there were also a couple of bric-a-brac stalls.

20150211_4210-Shwe-Inn-Thein-pagoda_resize

20150211_4221-Shwe-Inn-Thein-pagoda_resize

20150211_4218-tea-pot_resize

20150211_4213-tea-pots_resize
I wonder if the teapot with the violets on it is a relic from the days of the former British occupation?

20150211_4215-puppet_resize
this fierce-looking puppet is the Ogre, one of 28 characters in the cast for the marionette plays

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: making mulberry bark paper

I’d often wondered how Mulberry bark paper was made and we recently had the opportunity to watch how it is made:

The bark which has been peeled off the tree is first left to dry. It’s then soaked in water until it’s soft. Once it’s soft it’s pounded with a hammer for 20 minutes until the fibres start to break up.

20150210_3853-making-mulberry-bark-paper_resize

A handful or two is put into the pot, water is added and then vigorously stirred with a wooden implement that looks like a stick with a number of branches sticking out (a bit like a giant hairbrush).

20150210_3852-making-mulberry-bark-paper_resize

When the fibres are completely broken up and the water just looks cloudy, it’s poured into the frame which sits in a bath of water. Handfuls of fresh cherry blossom (or other natual elements) are dropped onto the surface.

20150210_3851-cherry-blossom_resize

It is then swished around by hand until the fibres and blossom are evenly distributed. The frame is carefully lifted out of the water and drained.

20150210_3854-making-mulberry-bark-paper_resize

20150210_3855-making-mulberry-bark-paper_resize

It’s then propped up and left to dry in the sun for a couple of hours.

20150210_3856-making-mulberry-bark-paper_resize

Voilà your mulberry bark paper is ready to be used in lampshades, writing paper, wrapping paper, purses, etc.

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds 14 November 2014

In November in south western Turkey these white flowers cover the hillsides after the first autumn rains. The flowers are daisies and what look like miniature narcissi. The narcissi, if that’s what they are, are only about 4 inches high

20141102_1937-white-flowers

20141102_1938-white-flowers

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: a blue door

Wabi Sabi indeed (embracing imperfection). I had already chosen this image of a battered, weatherworn, painted wooden door in Northern Cyprus before I knew that Kim had chosen this theme for this week’s Friday Finds.

201406020030-blue-painted-door

Can you see a face on the door?

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: by the seaside

201110150097_giant-aloe
These giant aloe flower spikes grow so big that they are often used to make fences and other things …

20141018_1905-Gumusluk

20141018_1906-Gumusluk

201410190016-hat-sun-parasols

201410190018-hat-sun-parasols
I love these sun parasols decorated to look like hats

fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: Arlon

On the first Sunday of every month from March to November, the Belgian town of Arlon plays host to a flea market that takes over the streets in and around the main square and the Belvedere. The vendors range from ordinary families having a clear-out to dealers of top notch antiques with plenty of mid-range oddballs in between. What I like about it is that you never know what you might come across. Last Sunday was no exception. There is a shop in the main square which deals in prints, wooden typographical elements, African masks and miscellaneous oddities. On the stall he’d set up in front of his shop was this glorious golden shrine.

201408030007-gilded-shrine-cropped

201408030008-gilded-shrine-detail
close-up of the door panel

The shrine was about 40cm high and 30cm wide. When I unlocked the door there was quite a large gilded chamber inside it.
I asked the vendor if he knew anything about its provenance. He replied that he’d been told by the person he bought it from that it was probably Russian.

If anyone can shed any light on this beautiful object, I’d love to hear from you.

201408030005-Arlon-mythical-beast
a mythical beast (one of several) painted on a brick wall above a window

201408030004-Arlon-house-front
a charming house front – I love the angel above the front door

Arlon-art-nouveau-ceramic-tiles
2 floral art nouveau ceramic tiled plaques

sharing with fridayfindsbutton2

Friday Finds: Limon cafe

On the coast road out of Yalıkavak going towards Gümüşlük is a small cafe cum restaurant called the Limon. It’s situated on the hillside looking out to sea. A path leading down to the coast will take you down the archeological excavations of Myndos.

200909130035_Limon

Set in a large garden area seating is provided in the form of big squashy sofas and armchairs. Here you can admire the view at any time of day, although the sunsets are probably the best!

201406060034-Limon-cafe

201406060048-Limon-cafe

200909130090-Limon-cafe-sunset

On a recent visit there we found these glass-covered table tops made from bits of crockery that had been broken in the restaurant.

201406060040-Limon-cafe-broken-crockery-table

201406060037-Limon-cafe-broken-crockery-table

There are other quirky decorative elements too

201406060046-Limon-cafe

201406060050-Limon-cafe-owl

201406060050-Limon-cafe-owl

It’s the perfect spot for a
201406060045-Limon-cafe